Some texts on Islamic communities in Bosnia, Sandjak and Kosovo

One of the biggest problems for someone interested in understanding the region of the former Yugoslavia is how to assess the credibility of the sources available. This is so even for researchers and scholars, but even more for average citizens who take some of their limited free time to look through the internet for articles and documents that may help them to go deeper than the small articles on news sites.

I remember the case of a blog in portuguese that I used to read, and whose author I appreciated and regarded as a serious, honest and intelligent person (I still do, but I am now more aware of his prejudices). This author, an academic with a PhD in Physics, was deeply engaged in the fight for secularism and against religious extremism. His blogging was part of a wider civic engagement which I respect and admire. Unfortunately, his concern regarding radical islam made him prone to Serb nationalist propaganda. When Kosova declared its independence, he published a post claiming that Kosova was a country dominated by radical islam, etc, etc, etc.

I was appalled, not so much for the fact that we didn’t agree on the issue of the Independence of Kosova, but because he was using as his source the Serbian nationalist site Serbianna and was accriticaly replicating a bunch of lies. It stroke me that an intelligent and educated person like him did not bother to take some time to evaluate the reliability of the sources he was using.

The fact is that this blog had a good audience and its readers tended to trust the good judgement of its authors regarding sources, even when they didn’t agree with is opinion. I am not mentioning the blog’s name because it is not relevant, this is not a personal attack, I left my opinion on its comment box, this is just an illustrative case of how difficult it is to fight the dominant prejudices regarding the Balkans and its peoples, and how even reasonable, moderate, educated people can be deceived by propaganda.

I decided to write this post because today I clicked on the wordpress tag “Kosovo” and found a blog written by someone who claims to have lived there, and to know a lot about the region, and there was this text about radical Islam in Bosnia. The post was very bad, and on his link list he had serious resources mixed with nationalist propaganda and genocide denial websites. It has happened to me quite often that people who have spent more time in the region that I did uses that as an argument of authority, and it seemed to be the case also with this blogger.

There is a whole body of literature analysing the impact of travellers accounts on the distortion of the image of contryes considered to be ‘exotic’ and the spread of prejudices about their peoples. Belonging myself to a country whose image suffers a lot because of its perceived ‘exotism’, I am aware of this problem and try not to focus too much on my personal impressions when I am researching and writting. It is not the fact that a person is living for years in, say, Serbia, and speaks serbian, that qualifies that person as an authoritive voice about Serbia. One is entitled to have an opinion and share one’s personal impressions, but the problem is that too often the temptation to lecture about it is impossible to resist, especially among bloggers.

So, today when I read this blog I really felt that it is important to fight this kind of obfuscation, by linking some texts that I think are well researched, balanced and reliable. They were written by Juan Carlos Antunez, a spanish military who has pursued studies on Islam, speaks Bosnian and Arab, and lived and worked until recently in Sarajevo as an international functionary.

Not everybody has to be an expert, but when we want to inform ourselves, the choice of sources is something we must take very seriously. However, for non-experts, it is sometimes hard to find texts that don’t demand much previous knowledge. I think the texts that i’m linking are very accessible even for someone who knows nothing on this issue.

In english:

Wahabism in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Published in two parts on the website of the Bosnian Institute. Part One here, Part two here

This paper was written primarily with the goal of providing some basic but accurate information to international functionaries in Bosnia.

An excerpt:

“””

For most International Community (IC) personnel, this is the first time in their careers that they have had to deal with any kind of Islamic issue. Part of the local media, often biased by nationalistic or/and political interests, have tried to present the problem of Wahhabism in B-H as a growing tendency that is a threat to safety and security not only in the country but also in the rest of Europe. These media have used a discourse very similar to that used at the beginning of the 90’s, changing the term ‘Islamic fundamentalism’ by ‘Wahhabism’. On the other hand, media close to the Bosniak establishment have tried to ‘hide’ any evidence of the Wahhabi presence in B-H, or at least to play down the importance of the phenomenon.

Most of the information gathered until now is based on the regurgitation of media or biased spread of rumours without further confirmation. A serious analysis must try to define who is a real follower of Wahhabism, in order to avoid misinterpretations. Only then can proper proposals be developed for stopping the ‘reported’ growing tendency, and reversing it.

This is a paper on the situation of Wahhabism in B-H, intended to represent original thinking about the real picture of the Islamic community in the country and not a ‘regurgitation of open-source wisdom’.

“””

In spanish: published on Athena Intelligence, a spanish research centre on terrorism and armed conflicts, with a particular emphasys on Islamic terrorism.

Presencia yihadista en Bosnia y Herzegovina,Athena Intelligence,  n.2/8 (3/4/2008)

Sandjak: un inestabile región entre Bosnia y Herzegovina y Kosovo, Athena Intelligence, December 2007.

Islamismo radical en Kosovo, Athena Intellingence, n.2/8 (3/4/2008)

Sorry for the non-spanish readers!

I’ll return to this subject and specifically to these articles when I have some time, which will not happen before the new year.

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7 Comments

Filed under Bosnia, Islam, Kosovo, Sandjak, Serbia

7 responses to “Some texts on Islamic communities in Bosnia, Sandjak and Kosovo

  1. Owen

    Serbianna has revamped itself to look like a modern objective rolling news site so there’s a bit more of an excuse to claim ignorance of where they’re at, but if the gent is an academic he doesn’t have much excuse for not checking the reliability of his source a bit more carefully.

    Oh Grandma, what big teeth you’ve got! – All the better to eat you with, my dear!

  2. Serbianna thrives on pointing out the discrepancies and anamolies of the potrayal of the Balkan conflicts by the mainstream western media. For example the mainstream media in general ignores Izetbegovic’s intellectual Islamic background and works, Serbianna points these facts out and seeks to potray Izetbegovic as wanting to make Serbs as slaves of the Bosnian Muslims. It also capitalizes on the very fertile Islamophobia in the west.

    Some may tend to dismiss the impact of Serb nationalist sites but one thing is clear if one reads sites such as the BBC’s “Have Your Say” one will always see that the international readership is pro-Serb and by a huge number. From a Bosniak and Albanian viewpoint this can be compensated by the fact that in the ground and on a governmental level things favour them.

  3. “one will always see that the international readership

    is pro-Serb and by a huge number.”

    Not necessarily. They are just a vocal minority of

    activists who hold extremist views (e.g. global warming

    deniers, anti-globalists, anti-capitalists,

    anti-American, anti-this/anti-that… then you have

    leftist apologists, right wingers, etc). When they read

    BBC news and disagree with the situation on the ground

    (e.g. that Serbia is still on a losing streak), they

    simply can’t accept it. So they become enraged and they

    keep posting pro-Serbia comments hoping they would

    influence BBC to ignore facts on the ground and start

    reporting in Serbian favor. Kosovo is gone, lets face

    it. Serbia lost all wars in the Balkans. It’s gotta

    hurt. But, let’s not forget that a sizable percentage of

    In conclussion, opinions are cheap, everybody has them.

    Srebrenica genocide is a fact, not an opinion, so they

    can think whatever they want. The World’s highest courts

    have ruled Srebrenica massacre was a genocide. They have

    also ruled on other important issues, like Markale

    massacres in Sarajevo; now it’s a fact that Serbs

    committed Markale massacres. It’s also a fact that

    former Serb generals in charge of the Sarajevo siege

    were terrorists; after all, the UN Court (ICTY)

    convicted them on terror charges. Having said that, the

    international readership of idiots can think whatever

    they want. They can’t change facts.

  4. “one will always see that the international readership is pro-Serb and by a huge number.”

    Not necessarily. They are just a vocal minority of activists who hold extremist views (e.g. global warming deniers, anti-globalists, anti-capitalists, anti-American, anti-this/anti-that… then you have leftist apologists, right wingers, etc). When they read BBC news and disagree with the situation on the ground (e.g. that Serbia is still on a losing streak), they simply can’t accept it. So they become enraged and they keep posting pro-Serbia comments hoping they would influence BBC to ignore facts on the ground and start reporting in Serbian favor. Kosovo is gone, lets face it. Serbia lost all wars in the Balkans. It’s gotta hurt.

    In conclussion, opinions are cheap, everybody has them. Srebrenica genocide is a fact, not an opinion, so they can think whatever they want. The World’s highest courts have ruled Srebrenica massacre was a genocide. They have also ruled on other important issues, like Markale massacres in Sarajevo; now it’s a fact that Serbs committed Markale massacres. It’s also a fact that former Serb generals in charge of the Sarajevo siege were terrorists; after all, the UN Court (ICTY) convicted them on terror charges. Having said that, the international readership of idiots can think whatever they want. They can’t change facts.

  5. Owen

    Faatih makes a good point about Serbianna but I think Daniel is right in identifying the Serb internet ambassadors as not hugely numerous but very vocal and persistent (frequenting the Guardian’s “Comment is Free” and various other little gathering places as well as “Have Your Say”). I’d describe them as the international readership of poisonous bigots rather than idiots.

  6. As we commemorate 60th anniversaty of human rights, over 1,000 Serbian extremists have set up Srebrenica genocide denial hate group on Facebook calling for Bosnian Muslims to be roasted and placed into a sulfuric acid.

    Reuters also covered the story, here is an update:

    http://srebrenica-genocide.blogspot.com/2008/12/facebook-shuts-down-srebrenica-genocide.html

  7. Sarah Franco

    yes, I saw that, the good part is, the group formed to close the group has now more than 20 thousand members, it has already been successful to close the first group, but they keep opening others, and we keep reporting them and asking facebook to close them. just a detail, they are not genocide deniers, they assume it, they are proud of it. it’s worse than denial.

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